Dota 2 Hero Guide – Juggernaut

Juggernaut is one of the most versatile heroes in the game at the hard carry position. His kit and design make him great at nearly all stages of the game, thanks to his abilities that give him a rather steady damage output the whole time. He also sports not one, but two ways of giving himself either magic immunity or near-total invulnerability, in the form of Blade Fury and Omnislash, respectively. Combined with his mobile Healing Ward, these two abilities make him more difficult to kill than most heroes of his kind—thus allowing him to stand out in a group of fragile carries.

But beneath his exterior as a highly adaptable core hero lie a few key weaknesses. Juggernaut’s attribute gain per level is average at best, requiring some fairly expensive stat-boosting items in order to be fully effective. As a melee carry, he is also quite dependent on movement speed and mobility equipment, and can be kited quite easily if he is caught lacking in either. Finally, he pales in comparison to other, greedier carries when it comes to deep late game scenarios, forcing he and his team to close games out before they get out of hand.

Balance is key for Juggernaut.

Image via Valve

He is, however, very easy to pick up and play, making him a very reliable pick in almost any situation. It’s really hard to go wrong drafting Juggernaut, especially if you and your team are planning to take supports with long disables like Shadow Shaman or Lion. His self-protection skills also mean that there is quite a large margin for error with Juggernaut, which allows even those that aren’t particularly gifted in terms of mechanics to do well with him.

The pros listed above are only a few of the reasons that Juggernaut has been a mainstay of the Dota 2 metagame for a long time. Pledge your allegiance to the Masked One, and he shall reward you with a steady blade.

Juggernaut Skill Build

Juggernaut’s ability progression practically never changes from game to game. Even if deviation is necessitated by the opponent’s hero composition or some other external factor, you can expect to move just one or two skill points in order to accommodate for this.

Blade Fury’s excellent scaling (both in terms of mana cost and damage) dictates that it should be maxed out first, followed by Healing Ward for better sustain during teamfights and when taking objectives. A single value point in Blade Dance early on boosts right click damage by a decent amount, thanks chiefly to its skill point cost-effective trigger chance of 20 percent. You’d be surprised at how much the critical strike from Blade Dance contributes to Juggernaut’s damage output in the early game—even if it is somewhat unreliable—so we recommend investing in it during the first six levels.

It should, however, be left at Level 1 until the other two non-ultimate abilities are maxed out, for Blade Dance’s scaling is actually quite abysmal. Omnislash should be taken at every opportunity, in order to maximize its damage and reduce its cooldown straight away. Do keep in mind, however, that its mana cost does spike quite sharply with each level; make sure that you check your available mana before letting it rip.

Thus, our recommended skill build is as follows:

  • Blade Fury
  • Blade Dance
  • Blade Fury
  • Healing Ward
  • Blade Fury
  • Omnislash
  • Blade Fury
  • Healing Ward
  • Healing Ward
  • Level 10 talent: +5 All Stats
  • Healing Ward
  • Omnislash
  • Blade Dance
  • Blade Dance
  • Level 15 talent: +25 Attack Speed
  • Blade Dance
  • Level 20 talent: +10 Armor
  • Level 25 talent: +5 Omnislash Strikes

Juggernaut Item Build

Generally speaking, there are two schools of thought when it comes to building Juggernaut’s inventory. There’s the Sange and Yasha path, which involves sacrificing the late game in order to boost your team’s ability to take teamfights early and follow up with objectives right after. This strategy hits hard and fast, especially when the enemy team is not prepared to defend themselves from frequent ganks and tower pushes. It does, however, exacerbate Juggernaut’s weakness in the late game, making closing games out quickly even more critical when going for this route.

The other involves purchasing a Battle Fury, which means buckling down in the early to mid game in order to farm neutral creep stacks in the jungle and creep waves in the side lanes. This tends to be the more common route of the two, due to the way Battle Fury synergizes with Blade Dance and Juggernaut’s naturally low base attack time (BAT). Moreover, farming with Battle Fury helps set Juggernaut up for some of the pricier core items, such as Manta Style and Butterfly.

Regardless of which path you choose, though, a Yasha-based item is an absolute must for Juggernaut. Its benefits are perfect for shoring up his weaknesses, particularly in the movement speed department. It’s simply too good to pass up, especially considering just how early you can get it and how cost-effective it is. Do not skip the Yasha; you can build it into something else more slot-efficient afterwards anyway.

Purchasing a Blink Dagger can be a good idea for Juggernaut as well. It allows him to instantly get into position for Omnislash, thus cutting the time it takes for him to use the ability by a huge amount. It also gives him a secondary escape mechanism, for when Blade Fury isn’t enough—which is usually the case when playing against teams that aren’t afraid of magic immunity.

Juggernaut Counters

Juggernaut is weak to heroes that have abilities with magic immunity-piercing properties, as well as silence effects that prevent him from escaping under the protection of Blade Fury. Doom in particular comes to mind first here, since using his ultimate on Juggernaut almost guarantees that he will die to the rest of the ganking team. Silencer also falls under this category thanks to Global Silence, though his silence effects can be purged off eventually after Juggernaut obtains a Manta Style.

Bristleback also tends to do well against him, due to his naturally tanky nature and the fact that Viscous Nasal Goo slows Juggernaut even through Blade Fury. In much the same vein, Axe’s natural resilience and ability to disable Juggernaut through Blade Fury with Berserker’s Call makes him excellent at taming the Masked One.

Heroes that have built-in ways of chewing through Juggernaut’s tiny mana pool are great against him too. Anti-Mage with Mana Break, Outworld Devourer with both Arcane Orb and Sanity’s Eclipse, and Phantom Lancer after purchasing Diffusal Blade all prevent him from using his abilities in the first place. Phantom Lancer in particular forces Juggernaut to choose which target to hit first, thanks to the huge number of illusions that he can produce with Doppelganger.

Despite his obvious shortcomings, Juggernaut is still a very stable pick—even in the hands of someone who isn’t exactly an expert carry player. Should your team need a reliable carry that doesn’t demand much in the way of mechanical skill, the Masked One can be a good choice for your draft. There is, however, plenty of room to optimize one’s play with Juggernaut, which can be felt in very tangible ways on the battlefield.

With good game sense and proper item and ability progression, Juggernaut becomes a force to be reckoned with. Wield his blade with precision and skill, and you might find that it is indeed sharp and cruel against all enemies.

 

* FirstBlood® is NOT AFFILIATED, AUTHORIZED, LICENSED OR ENDORSED by Dota™, Dota 2™, Steam™, Dota 2™, the Dota logo® and Steam™ are trademarks of Valve Corporation.

Leave a Comment

Categories
Login
Loading...
Sign Up

New membership are not allowed.

Loading...